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Kt Kishan Kt Kishan
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Exploring Karma


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Exploring Karma -Tales of a Universal Principle”
KT Kishan Warsaw IN
High in the reaches of Mount Kailasha is the abode of Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction. One evening Vishnu, the god responsible for preserving the cosmic order, came to see Shiva. He left behind at the entrance Garuda, the half-man, half-eagle composite, who served as his vehicle.Garuda sat alone, marveling at the natural splendor of the place. Suddenly his eyes fell on a beautiful creature, a little bird seated on the arch crowning the entrance to Shiva's place. Garuda wondered aloud: "How marvelous is this creation! One who has created these lofty mountains has also made this tiny bird - and both seem equally wonderful." Just then Yama, the god of death who rides a buffalo, came passing by with the intention of meeting Shiva. As he crossed the arch, his eyes went over to the bird and he raised his brows in a quizzical expression. Then he took his eyes off the bird and disappeared inside. Now, in the ancient thought of India, even a slight glance of Yama is said to be the harbinger of death. Garuda, who had observed Yama's action, told himself, "Yama looking intently at the bird can mean only one thing - the bird's time is up. Perhaps on his way back he will carry away the bird's soul with him." Garuda's heart was filled with pity for the helpless creature. That it was oblivious of its own impending doom further agonized Garuda and he resolved to save the bird from the clutches of death. He scooped it up in his mighty talons, rushed to a forest thousands of miles away and left the bird on a rock beside a brook. Then he returned to Kailasha and regained his position at the entrance gate. Soon after, Yama emerged from inside and nodded to Garuda in recognition. Garuda greeted the god of death and said: "May I put a question to you? While going in, you saw a bird and for a moment you became pensive, why?" Yama answered him thus: "Well, when my eyes fell on the little bird, I saw that it was to die in a few minutes, swallowed by a python, far away from here in a forest near a brook. I wondered how this tiny creature would traverse the thousands of miles separating it from its destiny in such a short time. Then I forgot. Surely it must have happened somehow." Saying this, Yama smiled and went away. Did he know about Garuda’s specific role in the matter? Nobody can know for sure. Garuda sat perplexed, mulling over the surprising turn events had taken.
Now the explanation: High in the reaches of Mount Kailasha is the abode of Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction.
The word“high” here is the place where a common man cannot touch; it is beyond any man’s reach and dream.
One evening Vishnu, the god responsible for preserving the cosmic order, came to see Shiva.
This is an exclusive club or an executive board or an elite club, people here makes decisions about who is in and who is out. The people here are very knowledgeable, full of Vidya and they are the Gnanis. They are cream of the intellectuals; they are the masters of the cosmos.
They are meeting at the evening time, a perfect time to discuss the world issues over a dinner. People on this high ladder probably also liked to enjoy a little drink, perhaps some cocktails and here of course, may be a glass of Amrita.
Lord Vishnu left behind at the entrance Garuda, the half-man, half-eagle composite, who served as his vehicle.
Garuda is the faithful cab/taxi driver, He is not allowed into the club. He needs to wait at the gate till the master comes out of the club.
Garuda is half man and half Eagle.
Eagles' vision is among the sharpest of any animal. Some eagles, for instance, can see twice as far as people. Studies suggest that some eagles can spot an animal the size of a rabbit up to two miles away. In part, eagles have excellent vision because their eyes, which are very large in proportion to their heads, are densely packed with sensory cells. While humans typically have 200,000 light-sensitive cells per square millimeter of retina, eagles may have 1 million -- five times more.
Eagles are also very powerful; they are among the world's largest birds of prey. The largest, including the Harpy Eagle and the Philippine Eagle, can weigh more than 20 pounds and have wings that spread eight feet across. Using their massive, sharp talons, these giants can kill and carry off prey as large as deer and monkeys.
With all these qualities, eagles are still the beasts of the nature. This is a human story and it needs some human qualities. Garuda is uniquely designed by the creator, having the attributes of both human and eagle.
Garuda sat alone, marveling at the natural splendor of the place. Suddenly his eyes fell on a beautiful creature, a little bird seated on the arch crowning the entrance to Shiva's place. Garuda wondered aloud: "How marvelous is this creation! One who has created these lofty mountains has also made this tiny bird - and both seem equally wonderful."
Garuda is a not an ordinary cab driver who is napping while waiting for the master in this story. He is engrossed with the sheer splendor of the Shiva’s place. He has those powerful eagle’s eyes. He is observing and enjoying the grand beauty of Shiva’s place and saying to himself WOW!! He has the mastery of sense of wonder. His eyes have caught the beautiful little bird. He is full of praise to the creator. He has fallen in love with the sheer beauty of the creation.
Most of us have grownup, we no longer catch our breath at the sight of a rain bow or the scent of a rose as we once did. We have grown bigger and everything else is smaller, less impressive. We have internet, satellite TV, jet planes, tall buildings, Disney world etc., we build mega churches with huge cathedral ceilings, we build exotic temples and mosques loaded with gold, and we create almost anything we want. Soon we get preoccupied with ourselves. We become immune to the glory of creation. We buy prepackaged food in the supermarket; we never think or blink about the bounty of God’s creation. We grow complacent and lead practical life. We miss the experience of Awe, reverence and wonders of the natural beauty of our creator.
Just then Yama, the god of death who rides a buffalo, came passing by with the intention of meeting with Shiva. As he crossed the arch, his eyes went over to the bird and he raised his brows in a quizzical expression. Then he took his eyes off the bird and disappeared inside.
Yama is very duty bound and he is much focused. His mission was to take the soul away from this doomed bird. He was very much there for that very purpose, But soon after he saw the bird he was puzzled, he had a quizzical expression. I wonder why? Something was different here, something strange happened, something larger than Life and death about to happen here. Yama has no time like Garuda to admire this incredible place; he rushed inside Shiva’s place
In the ancient thought of India, even a slight glance of Yama is said to be the harbinger of death. Garuda, who had observed Yama's action, told himself, "Yama looking intently at the bird can mean only one thing - the bird's time is up. Perhaps on his way back he will carry away the bird's soul with him.
Garuda's heart was filled with compassion for the helpless creature.
It was Garuda’s heart, not his intellect that was moved by the impending death of the little bird. The little bird in this story represents something of no importance or no significant in our day to day lives. This is a little bird, not some big powerful impressive creature, it is helpless, it has no protection around, and it is lost. It is dying!
Does it matter we care for this measly creature? We have no time for the poor or the sick lined up in front of a temple or church. These are just some nuisances, hindering our way to God. We are more interested in which God we need to be “really” worshipping. Is it Vishnu or Shiva or Jesus? We often fight which God is supposed to be superior. We are fearful of sickness and death. We do not feel comfortable in the presence of sick or frail measly or elderly people or in those with terminal illness, these things do remind of our own vulnerability to decline. We try to stay out of these situations.
Looking at this helpless bird, Garuda had a meltdown.
The little bird’s impending doom agonized Garuda and he resolved then and there to save the bird from the clutches of death. He swooped it up in his mighty talons, rushed to a forest thousands of miles away and left the bird on a rock beside a brook. Then he returned to Kailasha and regained his position at the entrance gate.
Love does hurt people, Garuda was agonizing. The power of Love caused a storm in his heart, he was not thinking whether he needed permission from his master, nor did he care whether his master would find out about his action which was indeed out of his regular ‘duty” and he was least concerned that he would get fired him from his job... He took an incredible risk. Sacrificial love had to be expressed in action alone. He was divinely gifted with the powerful wings and Love commanded him to put his skill or talent in this situation.
Most of us do enjoy staying in our comfort zones. Nothing like home, we have the security and peaceful living but we will never taste Love unless we take risk and venture out of our zones. Love is indeed a risky business. Garuda stung by the bite of Love, swoops the little bird up in his mighty talons. The story tells that he travelled thousands of miles! Love has no distance; Garuda literally goes the extra mile out of his crazy and irrational love for this little measly dying bird.
Soon after, Yama emerged from inside and nodded to Garuda in recognition. Garuda greeted the god of death and said: "May I put a question to you? While going in, you saw a bird and for a moment you became pensive, why?"Yama answered him thus: "Well, when my eyes fell on the little bird, I saw that it was to die in a few minutes, swallowed by a pytho


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