Asma Ahsan Asma Ahsan
Recommendations: 31

:) 20 month is very small age to be responsible,

Davide Castel Davide Castel
Recommendations: 39

That's when it all began...

Asma Ahsan Asma Ahsan
Recommendations: 31

Normally written as 'Port Said'

Davide Castel Davide Castel
Recommendations: 39

That's what I had original written, but it didn't look right, so thank you for clarifying.

Asma Ahsan Asma Ahsan
Recommendations: 31

A descriptive touching paragraph. I smile when reminded how for a child, having lice is the end of the world.

Davide Castel Davide Castel
Recommendations: 39

We used to call them 'nits' and we all smelt of turpentine!

Asma Ahsan Asma Ahsan
Recommendations: 31

Lol - i remember once I got them too. My aunt(who died later) put that turpentine in my head and took them out. A real torture.

Asma Ahsan Asma Ahsan
Recommendations: 31

Its like a shake. Mixing fresh raw eggs with liquid, usually milk, or just beaten with additives, to keep away colds in children.

Leonard a. Wronke Leonard a. Wronke
Recommendations: 23

oh...I never heard of that...thank you for clarifying this...my family had a warm milk solution to colds...my mother heated a cupful of milk, placed a slab of butter on top and added pepper to the mix(this was to help a child with a cold to get some rest)...it always seemed to work...it was way after, when I was an adult, the secret of why it worked was revealed...unbeknownst to me or my younger sisters...the milk had an extra added ingredient added that actually took care of the cold ...a small smidgen of brandy was poured in the bottom of the cup...the butter and pepper disguised the alcoholic taste...YEA, MOM.

Davide Castel Davide Castel
Recommendations: 39

Believe it or not, we used to go to the chook shed and pick up freshly laid eggs, then crack them while still warm and drink them. Yummy! In fact I still do this with organically free range eggs each mng. I warm them up first and drink one per day. It's great protein and very light on the stomach! Sorry Leonard...but it great and not terrible at all.

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Davide Castel Davide Castel
Recommendations: 39

The First Ten Years


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Another exercise we had to do about the first ten years of our life.


The first ten years of my life had begun
I was 20 months old when my sister was born
The Stork broke our window, it was no fun
I remember how mamma told me so in the morn
When a card was placed there, to keep out the cold
She said that I now had a new ‘Nina’, a baby sister
And that I was to kiss her, so I did as I was told
But I was jealous and slapped her tiny face in a twister. 2 comments


I was five years old, when I migrated to Australia
The big ship rocked and rolled and did not linger
Waves splashed over the sides of the deck each day
The steel toilet door closed, on my mammas finger
I was fascinated by the small boats, alongside our ship
With ropes dangling so as to heave and sell their wares
They seemed desperate, to make a shilling from this trip
It was in Port Said, where those bargains were now theirs. 3 comments


It took forty days, for our ship to berth at Station Pier
Then by train, we were taken to the Bonegilla Migrant Camp
For five long months, we lived in tin sheds and I felt fear
The smell of their food was strange and my bed was damp.
My sister and I were sent to live in a convent, run by nuns
While my father and mamma worked, to buy us a house
Our parents could only visit us once, in two weekly runs
For nearly three years, we suffered from lice and louse. 3 comments


We were so happy to live in our home, but it came at a price
For I had to share a bed with my aunty, who had paid for it
Her body trapped me against the wall, I felt ill, it was not nice
Finally she left to get married and I missed her, not one bit!
I loved my only doll; a gift from my father’s complaining sister
Who thought that was enough payment for having lived with us
Mamma made my doll a blue frilly ball gown, I couldn’t resist her
She sewed for the family, even my aunt and all without a fuss.


I was now able to go to a local school, where I made a friend
To this day she still is, even if we live a thousand miles away
She taught me survival and to follow my instincts to the end
Her life failed with her men, but I kept my man to this day.  
Our back yard was my family’s paradise and our playground
Mamma kept the garden alive with vegetables and flowers
We would drink fresh eggs from roaming hens all year round
So could not have asked for much better childhood hours. 5 comments


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